Therapy4u Counselling.  Swinton.  Greater Manchester.

 


http://blog.naturaltherapyforall.com/2014/06/12/the-magic-of-positivity/


The Magic of positivity

Iris McCann  -  Therapy4U  -   6/6/2014



Mahatma Ghandi said  

“Keep your thoughts positive because your thoughts become your words.

Keep your words positive because your words become your behaviour.

Keep your behaviour positive because your behaviour becomes your habits.

Keep your habits positive because your habits become your values.

Keep your values positive because your values become your destiny.”   


All these things are true, the magic of positivity and of becoming positive are the tricks we use to achieve it. 


How can we achieve positivity?

Well it’s in the way that we view not only ourselves but others,  if we truly believe in ourselves, and in our abilities then we become positive,  positive is as positive does!

With positive thoughts comes self-belief,  self-growth,  self-motivation, and  self -realisation, the more that we trust in our ourselves,  in our decision making abilities,  the more that we tell ourselves we are good, that we are worthy, we can do this,  we will do this,  the whatever this may be. 

The more we begin to realise that this can be and is true.  

If we falter, trip up or don’t succeed initially then we just try again, remember!  That we are not failures if or when we trip or fall, we are only a failure when we don’t get back up again!!

The trick is in believing and acknowledging that you are capable,  you are a good person,   you are worthy,   you can succeed,   you can self-motivate,   and in believing in yourself,   being negative is easy,   being positive requires work,   but it is work that is useful,   healthy and inspirational and important and necessary to your inner self and you!

You are important,  you are worthy,  all are positive affirmations to your inner self,   your optimistic self,   the one that can, will and does succeed.


Affirmations are useful and positive thoughts, use affirmations daily if you need to such as: – 

I am good,    I am positive,    I am independent,    I like myself,    my glass is always half full,    I am confident,   

I look for inner peace,    I am optimistic,    I am looking forward,     I am capable,   I can and will!

These may seem simple and you may feel you cannot say them to yourself,  it’s silly etc,  you don’t need to say them out loud,   just say and repeat them to yourself in your head,   and believe them,   and believe in yourself.


This inspirational and positive quote, made a huge impact upon me and my life at a very low time,  and I truly believe it to be true not only for me but many others also,  as well as inspirational!   

I give this to each and every client and patient I work with,  they may not always understand its meaning initially but they do understand when their work is done:-


When I wake each morning I decide...
This can be a good day or a bad day - my choice.
I can be happy or sad - my choice.
I can complain or I can cope - my choice.
Life can be a chore or a challenge - my choice.
I can take from life or give to life - my choice.
If all things are possible,
How I deal with those possibilities is - my choice.
                          Steve Shackel (MND Diagnosis 1994)
 


The power of positive thought is limitless to you!


Negativity is tiring it is draining!     


Positivity is uplifting! 


Positivity is our future!!!!


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http://blog.naturaltherapyforall.com/2014/01/30/hypnotherapy-for-fears-and-phobias/


Hypnotherapy for Fears and Phobias.

Iris McCann   –   Therapy4U  -   January 2014


 

How is Hypnotherapy different to other therapies? 


Hypnotherapy is a brief strategic therapy  -  one that is aimed specifically at finding a resolution to your problem, fear or phobia  as  quickly,  safely and efficiently as possible.  It is not a long drawn out method of solving a problem.   Within Hypnotherapy we utilise hypnosis,  a state of altered consciousness in which the therapist can help you to access the deeper levels of your awareness,  to which you are usually oblivious in your normal day-to-day functioning.   


More often than not, what you are experiencing as a problem or issue, whether it be emotional, psychological or at a psychosomatic level (i.e. actually producing physical symptoms)  is only a surface EFFECT of a deeper underlying mental/emotional CAUSE.   It is at these deeper levels of consciousness that we as hypnotherapists work with you to bring about a change in the way you feel, think and behave.   


Hypnotherapy for fighting Irrational fears or phobias?


A phobia is an irrational fear, a fear of a fear with no real reasoning, a fear of something that may not happen, or an object. People with phobias often experience unwanted responses to animals, insects, actions, vehicles, planes or places.  These physical responses are recognised as a stress responses, people will often describe their reactions as being “paralysed with fear”,  “having butterflies in my stomach”,  “ I can’t breathe, my heart is banging” or “just wanting to run away” from whatever is triggering the response.

People with phobias often recognise that their responses are irrational, which in turn can make it harder for them to accept their behaviours. “Why am I doing this, I know it can’t hurt me?” is something we as hypnotherapists hear from a client who comes to see us for treatment for a phobia.  It is estimated that more than 11% ( 1 in 9) of the population have some kind of irrational fear, making phobias more common than most of us realise.

In general most people can manage their phobia on a day-to-day basis and only seek help from us when it stops their being able to do something they really want to:  maybe holidays which require flying, swimming in the sea etc,  when they know a situation may occur which will force them to face their phobia. People are also aware of the possibility of unconsciously passing on their phobias to their children, who learn from their behaviour.

We often hear from clients “you’re my last resort” or “my final hope”.

Here are some of the most common phobias clients attend with:-


Claustrophobia         Fear of dentists       Fear of flying      Fear of heights      Fear of insects       Fear of needles  


Fear of Pregnancy          Fear of sickness (often linked to social phobias)           Fear of water

 


Life is what you make it,  so why not make it better?


 

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http://blog.naturaltherapyforall.com/2013/03/26/counselling-in-a-diverse-society/ 

 

          Counselling in a Diverse Society.           

Iris McCann.      Counsellor/Therapist  @ Therapy4u.  26/3/2012

 

In counselling as in everyday life, culture is the main difference between people, as in religion, race, age, class, sexual orientation, disability and gender. The cultural divisions within society and our cultural heritage impact upon the family and society as a whole i.e. where we come from, origin, religion, how we live, where we live and how we speak. This also relates within single parent, polygamous, same sex or monogamous family sittuations.

This maybe evidenced within counselling by differences between ethnic groups. For example differing religious views may have an impact on their view of life and the counselling process.  Some cultures may frown upon counselling as in some cultures, family comes first,  the client is singular, the individual is deemed to be not as important as the whole family.

Within some cultural backgrounds looking directly into the eyes is frowned upon, or not allowed. Touch can also be taboo so to shake someone’s hand could or would be deemed an insult. This could impede on eye contact, but not body language skills.

If a client is disabled,  physically or some way not immediately obvious, there maybe  problems understanding, if a client were deaf for example, so being aware of or knowledge of a form of sign language would be useful.  Also keep asking a client to repeat themselves can cause a barrier, the client feeling they are not being listened to of their needs not being taken care of.

These are just a few of the issues that as counsellors we will meet with in our daily practise, all are a learning process and give us an insight and knowledge that can only better our therapeutic process, personal learning and improve our practice.

 

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http://blog.naturaltherapyforall.com/2013/04/27/hypnotherapy-the-natural-way-to-aid-weight-loss/ 

 

Hypnotherapy – The natural way to aid weight –loss!

Iris McCann  Counsellor/Therapist.   @ Therapy4u Counselling.   27/04/2013 

Hypnotherapy in my view is a natural way to aid weight-loss, primarily because it helps to empower, reinforce and build up will power that is lacking. Building up will power helps to create a better new image, a more positive image and outlook, with reinforcing suggestions such as:

We don’t need to eat as much

Be happier, more in control

Be more confident in your decisions

Once reinforcing suggestions are accepted, a more positive way of viewing ourselves occurs, then we become more able to develop that new image, by using hypnosis suggestibility and acceptance to aid motivation, eating right and losing weight.

Self-hypnosis, is an efficient self-help technique and can be effective using appropriate cd’s or self-hypnosis downloads by planting auto- suggestions in our subconscious, to help increase motivation to lose weight, stop smoking and reduce stress, while in relaxation or asleep.

CBT within hypnosis is also helpful in giving you a new way of being, different perspectives on your beliefs, and in motivating a new perception of yourself.  NLP can also be very effective for changing perceptions of key problem foods.

I feel that hypnosis can help with weight loss, allowing us to overcome the unconscious obstacles preventing weight-loss. We recognise that eating too much is not sensible, and we are aware that exercise and a sensible diet are important. But these are not conscious logical issues, to succeed in losing weight I feel that re-educating the unconscious mind is the way forward. That hypnosis is one of the most natural ways to lose weight, a powerful tool because its suggestibility content has and does have the potential in helping build healthy habits, thus aiding a more natural easy weight loss, with a view to keeping the weight off, a new way of being, for reinforcing a healthier lifestyle.

I believe that hypnotherapy within weight loss and in conjunction with other therapies is one of the main ways forward, with all clients but mainly with clients suffering from low self-esteem, low self-worth, body issues, habitual eating and confidence issues.

 

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Social Anxiety Disorder and the effectiveness of CBT

April 30th, 2013 by Rachel L Winwood

Social Anxiety Disorder can develop during adolescence, and if not treated the condition can last long term. Individuals who have been diagnosed with Social Anxiety Disorder will often experience feelings of nervousness and dread surrounding social situations, which often stems from shyness and a lack of confidence. This condition can be very debilitating for the sufferer, who can experience enduring insecurity around relationships with family, friends and others; they can be extremely sensitive to criticism, and often fear they will be rejected. The sufferer will develop irrational thought patterns, worrying constantly how people may perceive them, often internalising views of others to be true about themselves. These thoughts will then magnify and become distorted. The sufferer may start to avoid these fearful situations due to the physical symptoms such as fast heart rate, shaking, sweating, and often blushing, which then makes the individual feel even more panicky that people will only look at them. These feelings often leave a range of emotions, with the sufferer feeling self-loathing, hating the way that they feel "different" or "stupid", leading to the individual to hate themselves. When the sufferer is in a social environment they become very quiet i.e. avoiding conversation, and making themselves appear invisible in a room. They may stop going to the shops, avoid speaking on the telephone, and inevitably going out of the house; this ultimately often leads to depression and loneliness. When the individual pushes themselves to go to a social event they will have often developed a range of safety behaviors as a coping strategy; these can include making sure that they know where the exits are; standing away from the crowd; avoidance behaviors; and ultimately, trying to escape from the situation.

People with Social Anxiety Disorder have developed a negative way of thinking that is twisted with reality; these thoughts then increase the person’s anxiety levels, and lessen the ability to cope. These thoughts occur instantly when they think about an anxiety-provoking situation. For example, if they have a fear of public speaking, just thinking about the situation will elicit thoughts of embarrassment and fear of failure. Cognitive-behavioral therapy has proved to be an effective form of treatment for Social Anxiety Disorder. With a directive/goal orientated approach, the therapist will often set homework for the client which helps to identify the irrational thoughts and beliefs (known as "cognitive distortions") that have been learnt over a period of time. CBT allows tools to be introduced in therapy which help the individual to replace negative thoughts and beliefs with a more rational thought pattern; this then will lead to improvement of anxiety symptoms. The individual has to be committed every day for several months to use the tools learnt in CBT to change their negative automatic thinking. Firstly, you might be asked simply to catch negative automatic thoughts and write them down, and then rationalize the thought. This over time becomes easier; with the help of the therapist you would work your way up to thoughts that are more realistic. Only then does it become automatic and habitual. The benefit of this approach is that you can help direct the client into a more positive way of thinking.

The therapist will usually use a behavioral technique known as exposure training. The therapist will work with the individual on providing exposure training which will gradually expose the client to their feared situations, with the future result being that, over time, less fear will be present. This can often involve role plays and imagining the situation, so that when in the real world the situation will become easier. These variations of technique help enable an individual to move forward. The success rate of CBT and Social Anxiety Disorder shows positive results; however, these will depend mainly on your positive outlook and enthusiasm to complete homework which is set by your therapist, and relies greatly on the person to confront their uncomfortable thoughts. Individuals that work hard on changing their thoughts and beliefs and believe that CBT will help them are more likely to improve. CBT is an intensive form of therapy which requires active participation; if the homework is done regularly, results can be long-lasting and well worth the effort invested.

 

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Depression in the Recession

May 8th, 2013 by Rachel L Winwood

It’s easy to understand how living in today’s recession has become a basis for depression. Families and individuals are suffering from feelings of uncertainty about their current and future job stability, with many facing redundancy or struggling to find work. The fear of redundancy or becoming unemployed can be one of the most stressful experiences one can face, with individuals beginning to worry about their finances and how they’re going to cope not only in the here and now, but anxious that they may lose their home in the near future. In today’s society, searching for a new job can be very difficult as the majority of people are in the same situation; this can be very disheartening for individuals receiving constant rejection, which sooner or later may destroy a person’s self-confidence, self-worth and ultimately might cause the individual to experience feelings of insecurity, weakness, and low self-esteem.

Losing a job for some people can be devastating and can bring upon many life changes; not only has the person lost their job, but they have also lost what may well have been a part of themselves. The person could feel a sense of loss and go through a grieving process like they would have if they had lost a relative or loved one. Job-loss depression can also impact on a person's physical and mental health, where often the sufferer will experience disturbed sleep patterns, poor appetite, become lethargic, experience low mood and become tearful. The individual might not want to socialise anymore as they possibly feel a sense of shame about losing their job and that they have nothing of value to say. They could become anxious as to how others will perceive them, and often end up feeling that they are not good enough. Suicidal feelings can develop, as the person may feel they have no sense of purpose. All these feelings indicate that depression has developed. Many sufferers of depression feel that they can’t talk to family or friends, and unfortunately this will only contribute to the depression further.

It’s important to recognise that most people who lose their job will experience sadness; however, there’s a difference between feeling sad because of a job loss and suffering from depression. Depression will interfere with the sufferer's general physical and emotional well-being. When a period of sadness lasts a long time, which is accompanied with an inability to engage with family or friends, then it’s advisable to see your GP for a referral to a counsellor.

 

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Controlling Relationships

May 21st, 2013 by Rachel L Winwood

 

A controlling relationship is when an individual will begin to dominate and intimidate their partner, often through emotional and/or physical abuse. It may be hard to recognise the early signs of a controlling relationship, as the victim may feel that their partner is taking care of them and being protective. The control often begins by checking their partner's mobile phone, managing all finances, examining phone bills and making sure their partner seeks permission to buy things; this can then escalate into wanting to know where their partner is at all times, ultimately taking away their partner's independence until the abuser is in total control.

Emotional abuse is where a partner will try to humiliate, criticise and manipulate through the use of verbal or physical assaults. The insults, insinuations, criticism, accusations and belittling can be wounding, creating very painful mental scars. This form of abuse slowly eats away at the victim’s self-esteem, confidence and sense of self-worth, which often leads the victim to cling to their partner. Controlling relationships normally develop from a sense of fear and insecurity; the controlling partner may be scared of losing the one they love. Many of the reasons as to why a person may control their partner can often stem from childhood; maybe they were neglected, or their parents may have been domineering. It is common for the victim to become involved in a repetitive cycle; after the abuse, the partner will often claim to be sorry and beg for another chance, often showering their partner with flowers and presents as a way to make up. However, eventually the controlling patterns recur and the cycle restarts.

The effects of any controlling relationship can be devastating. Unfortunately, those who have suffered the abuse of a controlling partner may suffer many negative effects; the victim will often find it very difficult to trust a new partner. The constant emotional abuse drains them of self-esteem. Living under this chronic stress can affect the victim both physically and mentally with symptoms such as Irritable Bowel Syndrome, anxiety and depression, and maybe suicidal ideation or attempts. Controllers often start out as emotional abusers and can move on to physical violence over time.

Those that recognise that they are in a controlling relationship are often afraid to end it. They may fear physical revenge from their partners. The victim will often cling desperately to the abuser, believing that this treatment is all they are worth. The controller will often try to take away their partner’s support system, wanting them to become isolated and alone; cutting off the support system will help the abuser to gain power and control.

The only solution to a controlling relationship is to break the repetitive cycle and end it, especially if one refuses to seek professional help and show a real effort to change; however, it can be extremely hard to break the pattern. Therefore it may help the individual to seek counselling, which provides a safe place to talk openly and confidentially while exploring feelings which will enable empowerment in making decisions. Although some couples may be able to work through the problems with intense counselling, it is important to acknowledge that this can be a long process

 

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http://blog.naturaltherapyforall.com/2013/06/11/bipolar-%E2%80%93-what-is-it/

Bi Polar – What is it?

Iris McCann   Counsellor/Therapist @ Therapy4u.  11/06/2013.

 

The Ancient Greeks were the first who documented and recognised changes in peoples energy levels and moods and coined the term/word “melancholia” (their word for depression) used by them to describe the symptoms or “mania” as they understood it.  The term Bi Polar as a basis of today’s, understanding for manic depressive illness was first recognised in 1854 by Jules Baillager and Jean-Pierre Falret. German psychiatrist Emil Kraepelin (1856-1926) used Kahlbaum’s concept of cyclothemia to develop these concepts to study and categorise untreated bipolar patients, and first used the term ‘manic depressive psychosis’.  “Manic-depressive reaction” was first seen in the American Psychiatric Diagnostic Manual in 1952. This term was influenced by the work of Adolf Meyer who “introduced the paradigm illness as a reaction of biogenetic factors to psychological and social influences”(Wikipedia march 2011). It was the German psychiatrist Karl Leonhard who in 1957 both first proposed and introduced the sub-classification of bipolar disorder, ‘bipolar (for those with mania) and unipolar (for those with depressive episodes only’) (Wikipedia march 2011).

During a manic episode some of the symptoms could be:

·        A feeling of constant euphoria and or elation

·        Being overtly promiscuous  or an increase in sexual awareness and behaviours

·        Overspending, more than is usual and without care or reason as to how it is to be funded

·        Not being able to sleep for long periods (usually 4/5hrs) early rising, full of energy

·        An extreme impairment in judgement, constant changing of plans and an overestimation of one’s personal capabilities

·        Disjointed, incoherent thinking, rapidly changing ideas, talkative, and possibly feelings of great optimism

Not everyone will suffer from all of these symptoms of Mania these are just some of the most common.  A persons sense of self and identity can often be altered/distorted by this illness, if the symptoms are severe there is a term psychosis (losing touch with reality) which is used to cover this.

Most sufferers of bipolar will also at some-time experience depression, this can follow on from a manic episode, or be the result of another trauma, or even a change in the weather (depression is more prevalent for some in winter months).

Some symptoms which are commonly experienced:

·        Self-blame, self-doubt, feelings of worthlessness and emptiness inside

·        Negative and pessimistic feelings about almost everything and everyone around

·        A sense of isolation from family and friends alike

·        Not sleeping well, early rising, or not wanting or being able to get out of bed until late

·        Lack of motivation and energy to do everyday things, such as eating, drinking, washing, general care of themselves

·        Lack of concentration

·        Thoughts of suicide, planning suicide, death in general.

Depression is different and far more pronounced than feeling sad and miserable, which we all have at times, it is the incapability of rational thoughts, feelings of uselessness, guilt, hopelessness, desperation and the inability to think normally, the impossibility of doing normal ordinary things every day, feeling different.

It is also possible that some sufferers may experience hallucinations, hearing, seeing, tasting and smelling things, or see or sense people who are not there, during both the depressive and or manic episodes, or also believe irrational beliefs (delusions).  These are again termed psychosis or a psychotic episode. As stated earlier not everyone who has bipolar will have all the above symptoms.

Here are a few of the many famous people who have bipolar disorder, either in the present or in the past, all can be found online on sites of public record:

Sophie Anderton - model,      Russell Brand - comedian and actor.    "In a low-key admission, he said he was finally diagnosed with bipolar disorder – manic depression – after he kicked drugs for good in 2002."     Frank Bruno - boxer; was hospitalized for a short period and is currently on lithium.            Neil Cole - former Australian Labour party politician. "Associate Professor Cole was the first politician in Australia or overseas to admit to having a mental illness, namely bipolar mood disorder."      Rosemary Clooney - singer and actress,      Patricia Cornwell - American crime writer,                 Richard Dreyfuss -  actor, BBC Documentary.     Patty Duke - actress.      Carrie Fisher - actress and writer. "'I ended up being diagnosed as a bipolar II,' says Fisher."     Connie Francis - singer.        Stephen Fry - actor, comedian and writer. "As a sufferer of the disorder, Stephen Fry speaks to other sufferers to find out about their experiences and visiting leading experts in the UK and US to examine the current state of understanding and research." Stephen has also recorded a documentary about the life of the manic depressive which aired on the BBC.     Paul Gascoigne -  footballer. "His second book, centres on his therapy - for alcoholism, eating disorders, OCD, and bipolar disorder, among others."     Mel Gibson - actor and director.    Robert Hansen - serial killer.      Vivien Leigh - actress       Jenifer Lewis - American actress, spoke about her diagnosis on Oprah in September 2007.       Spike Milligan - comedian     and   Catherine Zeta-Jones - actress.  As you can see all are talented people, maybe this is in part due to the condition.

There is still on-going debate as to the validity of using antidepressants by patients with bipolar disorder.  As some studies have shown their use can be a trigger for mixed, hypomanic or manic episodes, especially if not used in conjunction with a mood stabilizer, therefore possibly giving a worse outcome for the patient.  There is also a belief that natural omega 3 fatty acids when used in conjunction with the usual drug treatments could have beneficial effects on reducing the depressive symptoms, although the studies done are small in number and are varying in the quality of results.

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/womens-life/10124801/Nigella-Lawson-Are-you-in-a-controlling-relationship-How-to-spot-the-signs-of-manipulation.html

 

12:10PM BST 17 Jun 2013

A controlling relationship is when an individual will begin to dominate and intimidate their partner, often through emotional and/ or physical abuse.

It can happen to anyone: male, female, children, young people and old people, there is no distinction. And it can happen within any relationship: straight, gay, parent-to-child, child-to-parent. There are no obvious boundaries or 'rules'.

Being in a controlling relationship can begin in many ways, with many forms of abuse starting off as insidious and underhand – something small, such as your partner commenting on why you shouldn't wear a particular outfit or have your hair in a certain way. In most cases, it's all about control and taking away your independence.

In a relationship, abuse may start simply by your other half checking on your phone calls, or by taking charge of all financial matters, where the partner needs to ask permission to buy anything.

It is first and foremost about the abuser being in the control of the abused, initially seeming to be in a protective way, then by criticising, throwing insults, insinuations and accusations. Before long, belittling takes over. Sapping the energy and fight out of the abused person, the emotional stress and anguish that ensues, the fear of what is next, all slowly eating away at the abused person's self-worth, self-esteem and confidence.

Some abused people can also live a double life: at home they are possibly subservient, under control, under the thumb, but in their public life, work life and social life, the bubbly confident, in control person they have always seemed to be.

Emotional abuse does not always turn into violence, in many cases when we work with clients suffering from abuse they will often say that “the emotional stuff is worse," or “it’s in my head, I just feel so low, I am no good”. Others think nobody would believe them if they told them about their abuse, or blame themselves, thinking how could they have let this happen.

The effects of any controlling relationship can be devastating. Unfortunately, those who have suffered the abuse of a controlling partner may suffer many negative effects; the victim will often find it very difficult to trust a new partner. The constant emotional abuse drains them of self-esteem. Living under this chronic stress can affect the victim both physically and mentally with symptoms such as Irritable Bowel Syndrome, anxiety and depression, and maybe suicidal ideation or attempts. Controllers often start out as emotional abusers and can move on to physical violence over time.

Those that recognise that they are in a controlling relationship are often afraid to end it. They may fear physical revenge from their partners. The victim will often cling desperately to the abuser, believing that this treatment is all they are worth. The controller will often try to take away their partner’s support system, wanting them to become isolated and alone; cutting off the support system will help the abuser to gain power and control.

The only solution to a controlling relationship could be to break the repetive cycle and end it, especially if one refuses to seek professional help and show a real effort to change; however, it can be extremely hard to break the pattern.

Therefore it may help the individual to seek counselling, which provides a safe place to talk openly and confidentially while exploring feelings which will enable empowerment in making decisions. Although some couples may be able to work through the problems with intense counselling, it is important to acknowledge that this can be a long process. You could try Relate Counselling

Violent abuse

Where there is violence in a relationship, telling your partner you plan to leave may be dangerous and greatly increases the risk of violence. You may need time to plan your exit, and only confide in a trusted friend or family member. The Freephone 24 Hour Domestic Violence Helpline on 0808 2000 247 gives advice on your options including leaving to be with a friend or going to a refuge. Help is available for men via Mens advice line and for those in an LBGT relationship through Broken Rainbow.

If violence starts or continues after you have broken up with someone, or if you experience stalking or harrasment, communication with your ex is not advised. You should state clearly once via email or text you wish for no further contact and any you have will be regarded as harassment. Keep a record of any unwanted contact (including texts, emails and phone calls) but do not reply. Call the police if there is repeated contact or direct threats.

It is not unusual for an abusive partner to be remorseful post-break up. Indeed people can return to relationships having ended them, hoping their partner has changed. Sometimes they have. More commonly the violence continues and worsens. It can be difficult to break this cycle, particularly if you feel isolated or unable to tell others about your situation. Therapy or specific courses offered to survivors of violence may be useful here (see links above for how to access those). As might giving yourself time to recover and consider what you want from future relationships.

Some useful links

Iris McCann is a counselling director at Therapy4u, a Manchester-based clinic offering counselling talking therapies in fields from family counselling to hypnotherapy to life coaching.

Dr Petra Boynton is a social psychologist and sex researcher working in International Health Care at University College London. Petra studies sex and relationships and is The Telegraph’s agony aunt.

 

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http://www.BewleyBooks.com/mmm.html

  Needs - Driven by the Client

Autonomy – Within the Counselling Process!

by Iris McCann Counsellor/Therapist  @  Therapy4U    23/06/2013

Autonomy - ‘Respect for the client’s right to be self-governing’

Autonomy is a counsellor facilitating and protecting the Client in finding their own way, enabling them to become more self-aware, self-empowered, aiding a sense of self understanding, allowing movement forward to a better sense of well-being. Clients respond better when realising and understanding the confidentiality and trust enablement of the relationship.  The ‘client is the driver, the counsellor is the conductor’.  The client is in control ‘the client has the answers to their own questions’, it is for us to aid them in asking the right questions, to get the answers!

Autonomy, is the most significant of the basic principles in the BACP counselling ethics for me, to aid another’s self-awareness, acceptance of themselves To facilitate the client in seeing, recognising and accepting their life changes. Growing, who they may become, their potential, understanding life is a journey, recognising, choosing and carry on down that chosen path, the realisation, so profound, not only for them, but counsellors to be aware and witness it.  

 The principles of Autonomy opposes the manipulation of clients against their will, even for beneficial/social ends’ BACP Ethical Guidelines.

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Please Telephone to book an appointment or for more information:

Iris  -  07737 568151

Rachel  -   07854 888717

or email:

therapy4u@hotmail.co.uk 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please feel free to contact Therapy4U Counselling. Swinton. Greater Manchester with any

Talking Therapy Counselling, Sexual Minority Therapy, Life Coaching questions or Psychotherapy,

Hypnotherapy, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) and EAP queries you

may have with reference to your personal needs.

Therapy4U Counselling. Swinton. Greater Manchester, North West United Kingdom.